Bangladesh Artisans

Not sure what to get her for Christmas? This holiday season, give meaning. Every handcrafted gift from Ten Thousand Villages feeds families, provides healthcare, sends children to school, helps to build safe homes and empowers women. With every purchase, we fight poverty and improve the lives of makers and their families around the world. Whether she’s your wife, sister or mom, she’ll love unwrapping these unique gifts that give back on Christmas morning.

Handcrafted Jewellery

handcrafted jewellery

This Christmas, surprise her with a new necklace, bracelet or set of earrings. This sterling silver jewellery was handcrafted in Peru by the makers of Allpa. Allpa aims to improve the living standards of handicraft producers in Lima by providing technical help, product development advice, skills training, tools and equipment.

Cozy Scarves

cozy scarves

Gift her with a beautiful, cozy scarf that she can wear all winter long. Whether it’s made of viscose, chiffon or silk, all our scarves and shawls are handstitched by makers all over the world benefiting from a fair wage and safe working conditions.

Eco-leather Purses

eco-leather purses

Make her Christmas with a practical, environmentally friendly purse. These eco-leather handbags were handcrafted in India by the makers of CRC. Unlike the commercial leather industry, makers working with CRC tan leather products without using harmful chemicals. In other words, instead of using harmful substances, eco-leather is tanned using environmentally-friendly materials derived from sustainable tea bark extracts and waxes.

Divine Chocolate

divine chocolate

If she has a sweet tooth, gift her with her favourite chocolate bar, or try something new this holiday season. When you buy our chocolate, you improve the lives and opportunities of small-scale farmers.

What are you getting her for Christmas? Let us know in the comments below!

Now that fall is in full swing, it’s time to put away your flip flops and get out your plaid. Fall is a big season for fashion. Here are our top four must-have accessories for autumn.

Brown Crossbody Purse

brown purse

The start of the fall season is a great chance to switch up your everyday purse. Forbes says that “one of the most perfect bags for fall is a brown crossbody.” There’s no need to worry about matching your outfit to your purse with a neutral crossbody bag. Simply put your essentials in this purse, swing it over your shoulder and you’re ready for wherever the day takes you!

Cozy Scarves

teal scarf

Stylish scarves are a great way to stay warm while adding a different dynamic to your outfit. Glowsly says that “scarves that keep your neck warm are a season must. Scarves are warm and cozy, but they’re also as glamorous as can be.” This season, try different ways to style your scarf! If you’re stuck in a rut and need new ideas for styling your scarf, then check out this video.

Tassel Earrings

tassel earrings

Tassels are on trend this season. Glowsly says that “tassels are a fun way of adding a slightly bohemian vibe to any look.” For your everyday look, go with tassel earrings in black, silver or gold. For a weekend look, try something bold and go with pink or blue tassel earrings.

Long Necklaces

long necklace

A long necklace instantly dresses up any basic look. Forbes says that “gold dainty necklaces are timeless, but elegant and long necklaces are especially suited for the fall.” This fall, look for a gold necklace that’s extra-long.

What are your must-have fall accessories? Let us know in the comments below!

Jewellery-making has been an important tradition of the Tuareg nomads for centuries. In 1993, a group of young people in Terhazer, a village near Agadez, the largest city of northern Niger, began crafting leather products and silver jewellery by hand. After travelling through France and selling their handicrafts from backpacks for several years, Illies Mouhmoud and his friends began The Union of Peasants (UPAP) in 1999 to help artisans and rural people.

camels

Today, UPAP is an organization of 170 skilled Tuareg silver jewellers and leatherworkers. The Tuareg people inhabit the Saharan regions of North Africa, such as Niger, Mali, Libya, Algeria and Burkina Faso. Dressed in blue robes, they sit beneath airy tents in the desert and create breathtaking pieces of art using a lost-wax method with the same simple tools and techniques of their ancestors. Sometimes, Tuareg people are called the “blue people” because their traditional coloured clothing stains their skin. Tuareg artisans use income from craft production to supplement their subsistence farming. This income has enabled villages to build and equip schools, pay for medicine, ensure safer births and build wells. 

artisans

Illies Mouhmoud is a master silver artisan in crafting traditional Tuareg jewelry. Using a lost-wax method to cast the silver, Mouhmoud first creates a wax mold, forms clay around the mold and then pours molten silver into the hardened clay. Using hand tools, he etches traditional designs and adds ebony inlay or jewels to create the finished piece.

jewellery

Traditionally, the etchings represented safe trade routes. Similar to a map, the open spaces represented a ‘no go’ zone while the etchings were the routes. Today, the traditional techniques are used for artistic purposes and every piece of Tuareg jewellery is believed to bring good luck.

artisan

Thankful for their customers, Mouhmoud said, “Your purchases have helped us stay in our homes, to stay where we live, where we were born and where our parents and grandparents were born.” Visit our website to browse our entire collection of beautiful Tuareg jewellery.

It’s no secret that the commercial tanning process for leather is hazardous. Not only is leather tanned with compounds that are harmful to the environment, but this chemical process is also damaging to the health of the people working in the leather production industry.

Yellow purse

Many of our bags, purses and wallets are handcrafted using eco-leather by makers working with the Craft Resource Centre (CRC). CRC is a fair trade resource and marketing centre in India that tans their leather products without using harmful chemicals. In other words, instead of using azo dyes, formaldehyde and other harmful substances, eco-leather is tanned using environmentally-friendly materials derived from sustainable tea bark extracts and waxes.

Indro at Ten Thousand Villages store

Indro Dasgupta is the director of CRC and we were fortunate to spend time with him this past spring. During his visit with us, he outlined the eco-leather process. He explained that since the government in India has banned the use of cow in the production of leather, CRC eco-leather products are made with water buffalo. The water buffalo are first used for milk and meat, and then the skin, which would typically be considered waste, is sold to CRC for the production of leather. In other words, no animals are killed for the purpose of making leather. CRC is simply upcycling the waste produced by other industries.

Leather hide drying

Indro also explained that after the raw hide is collected, it is tanned with eco-friendly materials on a drumming machine and then it’s set out to dry. Once the leather is dry, it is then waxed, shined and sprayed. Finally, the leather is assembled into beautiful purses, wallets and bags.

Mallika

Mallika Manjari De is a quality checker and packer working with CRC. She is 28 years old and has been working with CRC for almost two years. When asked about how her life has changed since working with CRC, she said, “Life was difficult. I found it difficult to make ends meet. Now, I am able to buy necessities for my home.”

Brown purse

Eco-leather is more than a fashion choice; it’s a way to better the environment and improve the lives of people like Mallika. Browse our handcrafted eco-leather collection online.

Necklace and earrings

Thankfully, most Canadians have never experienced war. In Cambodia, however, people are still healing from the destruction of the past. Years after the Vietnam War and the Pol Pot genocide, Cambodia’s countryside is still littered with bomb and artillery shell casings. Reminders of war are everywhere, and healing is an ongoing process. As a way to heal from the past, the makers of Rajana Association use these reminders of tragedy and transform them into beautiful pieces of jewellery that are wearable symbols of hope, peace and strength.

Sovann

Van Sovann is one of the jewellery makers working at Rajana. He is 38 years old and has been working with Rajana for 20 years. When asked what he wants to share with Canadians, he said, “Thank you very much for your support. When you buy our products, it provides me with the ability to take care of my family.”

Van Sovann

Rajana Association

According to Sovann, it takes six people to craft one piece of jewellery and depending on how complicated the design is, three to four pieces of jewellery can be made in one day. First, the recycled brass casings are sourced and collected from a village nearby. Next, using an acetylene torch, the casings are cut and assembled into earrings, bracelets and necklaces. Then, symbols of hope and peace, such as doves, are engraved into the metal by hand. Finally, each piece is polished and shined. Sovann enjoys welding and assembling the pieces of jewellery.

Each piece of jewellery is a symbol of hope, peace and strength. By transforming symbols of war into symbols of beauty, Cambodians like Sovann are supporting their families, healing from the past and looking forward to the future.

Browse our handcrafted bombshell jewellery collection online and wear these symbols of strength wherever you go.

When I’m shopping, sometimes it feels like it’s getting harder and harder to make the right choices.

As ethical shopping options proliferate, it gets trickier to keep track of the overlapping benefits and drawbacks. The new field of choices comes with an expectation of nuanced understanding, but staying up to speed can be draining. For instance, when I’m at the market buying apples, it’s not just the variety that I’m considering. I’m also deciding whether to prioritize local, heirloom, or organically grown apples, each with their own health, community, and environmental impacts. This gets stressful.

So when I can, I default to fair trade. Right away, I know that the issues that matter most to me are being addressed. It’s built right into the system. Gender equality and non-discrimination. Fair pay. Environmental stewardship. Economic self-determination.

And that’s just the baseline. So many fair trade workshops and employers go beyond. Some organizations fund schooling for the children of makers all the way through university. Others provide microloans to their employees with very low or no interest – allowing makers to improve their home, attend to sick relatives, or start their own businesses.

More than anything, I know that fair trade is a trust-based system that puts the long-term needs of economically disadvantaged makers first. And that’s how I know I’m doing the right thing.

Working fair trade into your life doesn’t need to happen all at once – just work in stages as your budget allows. Here’s a look at how you can get started.

  1. Wake up to fair trade.

The easiest, most immediate way you can incorporate fair trade into your life is by switching to fair trade coffee and tea. The surest way to know whether your coffee is fair trade is to look for the Fairtrade mark. However, some roasters, including Level Ground Trading, forego the logo and instead commit to total transparency – which is even better. Beware of vague language like ‘responsibly grown’.

  1. Fair trade is served.

Why not pour your new fair trade coffee into a fair trade mug, and sweeten it with fair trade sugar? With fair trade serving dishes, spices, rices, and olive oil, there are lots of ways to prepare food while keeping fair trade in mind. These changes can happen gradually, too. Run out of a spice? Swap in a fair trade one. Soon your pantry will be fully (and fairly) stocked.

You can also look for fair trade at the grocery store. Bananas and chocolate are the options most people are familiar with, but look too for fair trade avocados and quinoa. In both cases, North American food trends have led to an explosion in demand, making them too expensive for the farmers to afford for themselves. No fair trade options at your supermarket? Talk to your grocer.

  1. Think outside the big box.

A little outdoor décor can go a long way – for you, and the maker. Ceramic pots, windchimes, birdbaths and wall hangings are the kinds of purchases you make less often; however each one can have an outsized impact.

A terracotta pot goes through at least six stages before being shipped, and the workshop we source from in Bangladesh employs twenty people. Choosing fair trade outdoor décor helps to keep communities like theirs thriving. 

  1. Go flare trade.

If you think all fair trade jewellery is just a few beads on a string, let me be the first to welcome you to this century. Fair trade groups across the developing world are getting incredibly sophisticated, using familiar materials like brass, silver, and bronze, as well as more exotic materials like bone, tagua, and capiz. While simpler pieces remain an entry point for new jewellery workers to get their start, you’ll be amazed at the variety available.

Looking for an engagement ring? Let fair trade be your guide in this department, too. Ask your jeweller about fair trade gold, platinum, and gemstones.

  1. Relax into fair trade.

Fair trade home décor is worth a second look. For lots of people, fair trade home décor pieces have a reputation of being dull coloured, having poor construction, and being unstylishly designed. Today, this couldn’t be farther from the truth.

New materials and in-house designers have helped makers maintain traditional techniques while updating designs to better fit a more modern aesthetic. Can you still find authentic pieces from around the world at Ten Thousand Villages? Of course. But you’ll also find pieces that work in minimalist studios and retro kitchens.

  1. Wear fair.

The complexities of the fashion industry have made it an uphill battle for fair trade clothing manufacturers, but today you can find everything from socks and leggings to dresses and tops that are 100% fair trade – but depending on where you live, online shopping might be your only option.

Accessories are an easier switch. There’s no compromise on quality when you switch to fair trade bags, scarves and clutches. Many of the makers that we work with are second- or third-generation tailors or leatherworkers with a deep understanding of their craft. With trendy pieces that appeal to this season’s fashion and classic pieces that last a lifetime, Ten Thousand Villages should be your first stop for fair trade accessories.

  1. Fair trade… beyond?

As comprehensive as this list looks, it’s certainly not the whole picture. Fair trade is a set of principles, not a set of products, so as more people start shopping fair trade, the variety of items available should keep expanding. Who knows? Maybe soon we’ll be able to buy fair trade phones, or toasters. The possibilities are limitless, so keep your eyes open, and remember: when you start feeling overwhelmed by your purchasing choices, choose fair trade.