Bangladesh Artisans

Thanksgiving is just around the corner and we couldn’t be more excited to spend time with our families and eat all the yummy food. And if it’s your turn to host a Thanksgiving dinner this year, why not set the table with beautiful, globally responsible, handcrafted pieces from around the world? With every Ten Thousand Villages purchase, makers are paid fairly for their work which helps them to take care of their families. This Thanksgiving, set the table for your family with items that help families all over the world.

The Appetizers

cutting board

As guests are arriving to your Thanksgiving dinner, greet them with a charcuterie board filled with various delicious appetizers. HGTV suggests using a “larger tray to create a big cheese board for some pre-dinner snacking.”

The Centerpiece

centerpiece

An assortment of apples, pumpkins or gourds makes for an easy Thanksgiving themed centerpiece for your dinner table. Best Products says “tiny pumpkins are without a doubt, the perfect place setting for your Thanksgiving table. If a trip to the pumpkin patch isn’t in the cards for you this year, faux pumpkins (that you can reuse year after year!) will do in a pinch.” Just place them in a bowl or basket, and voilà, you’re done!

centerpiece

The Main Course

dishes

Now it’s time to serve the turkey and all the delicious side dishes! HGTV says that a “matching serving dish set is perfect for your turkey and smaller side dishes.”  

The Dessert

cake stand

Skip the pumpkin pie this year and try something different for dessert! Jillian Harris says that a “cake stand is the perfect way to showcase your baking skills when you have guests over.” She suggests stacking one with “cupcakes, delicious pastries or an indulgent cake.”

Do you have any Thanksgiving table decorating tips? Let us know how you decorate your table for Thanksgiving in the comments below!

Happy first day of fall! Here at Ten Thousand Villages, we’re a little sad that summer days are over but we’re excited for all the fall things that autumn brings like pumpkin spice lattes, sweater weather and scary movies. With Thanksgiving dinners and Halloween parties approaching, fall is also a great time to refresh your home! Here are some tips for giving your home a cozy, fall makeover.

Baskets

baskets

Baskets are great because not only do they add a rustic, fall touch to your living room but they double as storage space too. Elle Décor suggests warming up a room with “cozy accessories such as pillow-and-throw-filled baskets.”

Rugs

rugs

Keep your feet warm on hardwood floors and add a decorative touch to your kitchen or family room with a rug. House and Home says that a standout rug is like “artwork for your floor.” They believe that a standout rug “pulls the room together, interjecting life and personality into the space.”

Throws

chair with throw

Add warmth and decoration to your living room or bedroom with a fringe throw, blanket or quilt. Country Living encourages homeowners to “find throws with different textures and colours for a bit of visual variety.”

Plants

chair with plant

This fall, trade colourful summer flowers in for a statement plant. House and Home says a statement plant “creates major impact – especially when potted in a standout planter.”

Candles

candle

Candles are an easy way to add those fall vibes to your home. Shutterfly says that candles give homes “rustic charm.” For Halloween, add pumpkins and pinecones to your candle display.

Do you have any fall decorating tips? Let us know how you decorate your home for fall in the comments below!

Blue rug

Handcrafted by makers working with Kumbeshwar Technical School (KTS), KTS rugs are the perfect addition to your living room, family room or bedroom. Traditionally, these rugs were made with the intention of sitting and sleeping on them, but the rugs are now made with the purpose of adding warmth and decoration to a room.

Leaf rug

Each rug takes five people to craft and is made from hand spun Tibetan sheep wool.  First, one person hand spins the sheep wool into yarn. Second, using environmentally friendly dyes, one person hand dyes the yarn. Then, one person winds the yarn before another person weaves the rug. Finally, the process ends with one person trimming. In one day, one individual can finish 0.138 square metres of the rug. Four out of five of these tasks are usually done by women.

Woman making a rug

The Kumbeshwar Technical School (KTS) offers training in wool spinning, hand knitting and carpet weaving to members of low-caste communities in Nepal. Graduates of the training program have the opportunity to move into employment at KTS or to establish their own workshops. KTS embraces environmentally friendly practices such as the use of AZO-friendly dyes for carpets. In addition to the technical school, KTS operates an orphanage for abandoned children, a nursery, a primary school for children from impoverished families and a workplace daycare. Other benefits include literacy classes, training in writing and basic numeracy, women’s health education, health and accident insurance and access to loans.

Sita B K is one of the carpet weavers working at KTS. She is 48 years old and has been working with KTS for 14 years.

“I have experienced a lot of changes since joining KTS. I have become independent and can send my children to the KTS primary school. I would like to thank you all for buying our products.”

Sita B K

Kumbeshwar Technical School (KTS)

Add a touch of warmth and decoration to your home with one of these beautiful, handcrafted rugs.

When I’m shopping, sometimes it feels like it’s getting harder and harder to make the right choices.

As ethical shopping options proliferate, it gets trickier to keep track of the overlapping benefits and drawbacks. The new field of choices comes with an expectation of nuanced understanding, but staying up to speed can be draining. For instance, when I’m at the market buying apples, it’s not just the variety that I’m considering. I’m also deciding whether to prioritize local, heirloom, or organically grown apples, each with their own health, community, and environmental impacts. This gets stressful.

So when I can, I default to fair trade. Right away, I know that the issues that matter most to me are being addressed. It’s built right into the system. Gender equality and non-discrimination. Fair pay. Environmental stewardship. Economic self-determination.

And that’s just the baseline. So many fair trade workshops and employers go beyond. Some organizations fund schooling for the children of makers all the way through university. Others provide microloans to their employees with very low or no interest – allowing makers to improve their home, attend to sick relatives, or start their own businesses.

More than anything, I know that fair trade is a trust-based system that puts the long-term needs of economically disadvantaged makers first. And that’s how I know I’m doing the right thing.

Working fair trade into your life doesn’t need to happen all at once – just work in stages as your budget allows. Here’s a look at how you can get started.

  1. Wake up to fair trade.

The easiest, most immediate way you can incorporate fair trade into your life is by switching to fair trade coffee and tea. The surest way to know whether your coffee is fair trade is to look for the Fairtrade mark. However, some roasters, including Level Ground Trading, forego the logo and instead commit to total transparency – which is even better. Beware of vague language like ‘responsibly grown’.

  1. Fair trade is served.

Why not pour your new fair trade coffee into a fair trade mug, and sweeten it with fair trade sugar? With fair trade serving dishes, spices, rices, and olive oil, there are lots of ways to prepare food while keeping fair trade in mind. These changes can happen gradually, too. Run out of a spice? Swap in a fair trade one. Soon your pantry will be fully (and fairly) stocked.

You can also look for fair trade at the grocery store. Bananas and chocolate are the options most people are familiar with, but look too for fair trade avocados and quinoa. In both cases, North American food trends have led to an explosion in demand, making them too expensive for the farmers to afford for themselves. No fair trade options at your supermarket? Talk to your grocer.

  1. Think outside the big box.

A little outdoor décor can go a long way – for you, and the maker. Ceramic pots, windchimes, birdbaths and wall hangings are the kinds of purchases you make less often; however each one can have an outsized impact.

A terracotta pot goes through at least six stages before being shipped, and the workshop we source from in Bangladesh employs twenty people. Choosing fair trade outdoor décor helps to keep communities like theirs thriving. 

  1. Go flare trade.

If you think all fair trade jewellery is just a few beads on a string, let me be the first to welcome you to this century. Fair trade groups across the developing world are getting incredibly sophisticated, using familiar materials like brass, silver, and bronze, as well as more exotic materials like bone, tagua, and capiz. While simpler pieces remain an entry point for new jewellery workers to get their start, you’ll be amazed at the variety available.

Looking for an engagement ring? Let fair trade be your guide in this department, too. Ask your jeweller about fair trade gold, platinum, and gemstones.

  1. Relax into fair trade.

Fair trade home décor is worth a second look. For lots of people, fair trade home décor pieces have a reputation of being dull coloured, having poor construction, and being unstylishly designed. Today, this couldn’t be farther from the truth.

New materials and in-house designers have helped makers maintain traditional techniques while updating designs to better fit a more modern aesthetic. Can you still find authentic pieces from around the world at Ten Thousand Villages? Of course. But you’ll also find pieces that work in minimalist studios and retro kitchens.

  1. Wear fair.

The complexities of the fashion industry have made it an uphill battle for fair trade clothing manufacturers, but today you can find everything from socks and leggings to dresses and tops that are 100% fair trade – but depending on where you live, online shopping might be your only option.

Accessories are an easier switch. There’s no compromise on quality when you switch to fair trade bags, scarves and clutches. Many of the makers that we work with are second- or third-generation tailors or leatherworkers with a deep understanding of their craft. With trendy pieces that appeal to this season’s fashion and classic pieces that last a lifetime, Ten Thousand Villages should be your first stop for fair trade accessories.

  1. Fair trade… beyond?

As comprehensive as this list looks, it’s certainly not the whole picture. Fair trade is a set of principles, not a set of products, so as more people start shopping fair trade, the variety of items available should keep expanding. Who knows? Maybe soon we’ll be able to buy fair trade phones, or toasters. The possibilities are limitless, so keep your eyes open, and remember: when you start feeling overwhelmed by your purchasing choices, choose fair trade.