Bangladesh Artisans
Blue rug

Handcrafted by makers working with Kumbeshwar Technical School (KTS), KTS rugs are the perfect addition to your living room, family room or bedroom. Traditionally, these rugs were made with the intention of sitting and sleeping on them, but the rugs are now made with the purpose of adding warmth and decoration to a room.

Leaf rug

Each rug takes five people to craft and is made from hand spun Tibetan sheep wool.  First, one person hand spins the sheep wool into yarn. Second, using environmentally friendly dyes, one person hand dyes the yarn. Then, one person winds the yarn before another person weaves the rug. Finally, the process ends with one person trimming. In one day, one individual can finish 0.138 square metres of the rug. Four out of five of these tasks are usually done by women.

Woman making a rug

The Kumbeshwar Technical School (KTS) offers training in wool spinning, hand knitting and carpet weaving to members of low-caste communities in Nepal. Graduates of the training program have the opportunity to move into employment at KTS or to establish their own workshops. KTS embraces environmentally friendly practices such as the use of AZO-friendly dyes for carpets. In addition to the technical school, KTS operates an orphanage for abandoned children, a nursery, a primary school for children from impoverished families and a workplace daycare. Other benefits include literacy classes, training in writing and basic numeracy, women’s health education, health and accident insurance and access to loans.

Sita B K is one of the carpet weavers working at KTS. She is 48 years old and has been working with KTS for 14 years.

“I have experienced a lot of changes since joining KTS. I have become independent and can send my children to the KTS primary school. I would like to thank you all for buying our products.”

Sita B K

Kumbeshwar Technical School (KTS)

Add a touch of warmth and decoration to your home with one of these beautiful, handcrafted rugs.

artisan-rafia-nasir-s72I sit beside Rafia Nasir on the loom, where she works on a 6’ x 9’ Persian rug with her two sisters.

Rafia is a new mom, just like I am. She holds her nearly eight-month-old little girl, letting her grab at the taut warp threads as she takes a break from her work. Rafia chuckles as I have to run and change my son’s diaper, tossing him down on her charpai – a rope bed, in the middle of her home – and asking if she minds if I change him there. It’s my son’s first trip to the villages of Pakistan. And at age two, he’s taking it all in, including the chicken running into the house from the outside courtyard.